Life on Other Planets Geek Out

Could there be life on other planets? Time for a Geek Out! Richard chats with Carl about Fermi’s Paradox, Drake’s Equation and all the latest science we’ve gathered around how common life is on other planetary bodies. This does lead to a discussion about what makes a planet a planet in the first place – that definition is changing and being heavily debated. And as for intelligent life… well, that’s a whole other problem!

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MSIX with Andrew Clinick

Desktop installation needs to get better! While at Build in Seattle, Carl and Richard talked to Andrew Clinick about MSIX, the next generation installation technology from the Windows team. MSIX is open source and available at GitHub, and works to make your desktop application installation experience a bit less painful. Andrew discusses the various approaches that Microsoft has taken over the years around installation and some of the unintended consequences that have come along – all that learning has been merged into MSIX to make desktop installation better. Check it out!

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Windows Sets with Raymond Chen and Jason Watson

Tabs for Windows apps? While at Build in Seattle, Carl and Richard talked to legend Raymond Chen and Jason Watson about the upcoming Sets capabilities in Windows 10. The conversation dives into the virtual desktop, Windows 10 timeline and other tech to get you back to a productive state quickly, from one device to another. Jason and Raymond talk about how developers can add functionality to their applications to take advantage of Sets to further increase productivity. Windows continues to evolve!

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Writing High Performance .NET Core Code with Ben Watson

.NET Core is fast, but does how you write code in .NET Core help with performance? Carl and Richard talk to Ben Watson about the 2nd Edition of his HIgh Performance .NET Code book. The original edition came out in 2014 when .NET Core was just beginning (ASync/Await were brand new too!) and so an update is welcome. Ben explains that there is no one right way to write high performing code, every implementation is on a case-by-case basis. You need to benchmark and instrument to understand where bottlenecks are, then measure performance carefully before you start trying to improve. But there are a bunch of options available to improve performance!

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MFractor Update with Matthew Robbins

MFractor grows up! Carl and Richard talk to Matthew Robbins about the progress he’s made over the past 18 months (since his last show) on MFractor – now an extension for Visual Studio for the Mac to make building mobile applications with Xamarin easier. Matt talks about improving the mobile development cycle – the time it takes from writing code on your PC to it running on your smartphone, and recognizing that it’s not just about compile and transfer times. It’s also image sizing and copying, catching errors early and more – things that can be done while writing code!

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Announcing .NET Core 3 with Scott Hunter

Fresh from Build (actually recorded before Build) – a new version of .NET Core! Carl and Richard talk to Scott Hunter about the announcement of .NET Core 3. Scott leads off with a conversation around .NET Core 2.1, now a release candidate at Build. And then the big news, the next version of Core bringing love to the desktop side, at least for Windows. Versions of WinForms and WPF run against Core. It’s a separate package because it’s not cross-platform, but it certainly brings new Windows desktop development to Core! Check out the build.microsoft.com site for video on Core 3!

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Constraints Liberate with Mark Seemann

Do constraints liberate? Carl and Richard talk to Mark Seemann about the very constraints that developers often argue against – pointing out how those constraints can actually make us more productive. Mark talks about memory management, such as garbage collection in .NET, while a constraint (you can’t do what you want with memory) actually liberates you from thinking about memory. The same with static typing – decide on a type once, and stop worrying about it. The question is, are you surrounding yourself with the constraints that liberate you?

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RavenDB V4 with Kamran Ayub

Where do you store your objects? Carl and Richard talk to Kamran Ayub about the latest version of RavenDB. Kamran talks about his experiences implementing Raven in different projects all the way back to version 2 – and how much he appreciates that this latest version offers a ton more features and the kind of stability you need in a data storage tool. The comparisons to MongoDB are inevitable, and it’s impressive how similar they are – but clearly RavenDB has a .NET spin! Of course, it’s open source and cross-platform, so you can run RavenDB anywhere you like – even a Raspberry PI!

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Building UI on the Web using Ooui with Frank Krueger

How do you build your web UI? Carl and Richard talk to Frank Krueger about his work on Ooui (pronounced whee), an open source project for implementing a Xamarin-forms like UI experience to the browser. The result is pretty amazing, including a web-based XAML editor that all runs in the browser… super fast! Frank talks about his experiences building code that runs with WebAssembly and the challenges of thinking through new UI experiences. The challenge is the variations in implementation – is XAML destined to fragment further, or can they all come together?

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Blazor and WebAssembly with Rocky Lhotka

Blazor is getting some buzz, but is it really useful? Carl and Richard talk to Rocky Lhotka about his thoughts around how Blazor uses WebAssembly (WASM) to let C# run on the browser – and what that means for client-side development, both web-based and regular desktop client. Rocky talks about how WASM is an equal-opportunity feature for all sorts of languages, and covering the four big browsers: Chrome, Edge, Firefox and Safari. Could the future of enterprise apps be all in the browser? Between Progressive Web Apps and WASM, this might be the way forward!

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