Report: Java 8 remains the most dominant version of Java

A majority of Java developers are using Java 8 or lower. This is based on a newly released report that revealed 79 percent of developers are using Java 8, 9 percent are using Java 7 and 3 percent are using Java 6 or below.

The JVM Ecosystem Survey Report was designed to look at the landscape of Java in terms of JDK implementations, tools, platforms and applications. The report was sponsored by Snyk and Oracle, is based off of more than 10,200 questionnaires, and was conducted through Java User Groups around the world.

The report took place between the release of Java 10 and Java 11. Due to structural changes to the JDK in Java 9, survey sponsors expected that would impact its migration and adoption. Only 4 percent of developers are using Java 9 and an additional 4 percent stated they were using Java 10.

Java 9 also brought a number of architectural changes as well as a new release cadence for Java SE versions. For instance, Java SE versions ship every six months while every two to three years a Long Term Support (LTS) release is offered. Java 9 was not a LTS release. When asked how developers are responding to Java’s new release cycle, only 8 percent stated they stay on top of the latest versions. Thirty percent decide on a release-by-release basis, 34 percent stay with the LTS release and another 28 percent “don’t know yet.”

“We expect that in the forthcoming year, best practices will emerge and companies will settle into a preferred migration cycle, which likely will vary considerably by industry,” the report stated.

When looking at JDK implementations used in production, the report found a majority of developers are using Oracle JDK for their main applications.

According to the report, 70 percent of respondents stated they use Oracle JDK in production while OpenJDK took 21 percent of the market share. Other JDK implementations included Eclipse OpenJ9/IBM J9, Android SDK, and Azul. “However, future licensing and support changes might cause these numbers to change in the future,” the report stated.

On the JDK side, the report also looked at versions of Java EE used for main applications, and the main JVM language used. About 40 percent of respondents claimed they do not use enterprise Java. Another 27 percent are using Java EE 7, and 22 percent are using Java EE 8. Java is the preferred JVM language with 9 in 10 developers claiming to use it. Other JVM languages used include Clojure, Kotlin, Groovy and Scala.

Java tools
The report also looked at the types of tools Java developers are using. According to the report, IntelliJ IDEA has surpassed Eclipse IDE with 45 percent of respondents using it. Thirty-eight percent of respondents are using Eclipse. Other IDEs used included Apache NetBeans, Vim, and Visual Studio Code.

For build tools, Maven is by far the most used in projects with 60 percent of respondents using it. This coincides with a 2016 report from RebelLabs, which found out of its 2,000 respondents, 68 percent were using Maven.

Other findings in this space included:

  • SonarQube, Findbugs and Checkstyle dominate the static quality tools space
  • Seventy-two percent of respondents use a static security tool in their testing
  • Jenkins is the number one CI server
  • Git is the top source code management platform
  • GitHub and Bitbucket are tied for developers main code repository, with GitLab closely following behind

Java platforms and applications
When looking into cloud technologies, the report found almost half of respondents are not using a cloud platform of some sort. For the 57 percent that are using cloud platforms, Amazon AWS is the top cloud provider, followed by Google Cloud, Azure, Red Hat OpenShift and Oracle Cloud.

In terms of the cloud approaches respondents use, 43 percent are using containers, VMs are still in the game at 33 percent, and serverless technology is still in its infancy with only 9 percent using this approach.

Other findings included:

  • Forty-three percent of respondents are not using continuous deployment or release automation tools, and 18 percent don’t know what they are using
  • Front end JavaScript and SQL are the type of non-JVM languages used in applications
  • Spring Boot and Spring MVC are the top web frameworks used by respondents
  • Sixty-four percent of respondents develop the same app server they use in production
  • 1 in 4 respondents don’t know how many open-source dependencies they have in their applications

The post Report: Java 8 remains the most dominant version of Java appeared first on SD Times.

via Click on the link for the full article

Report: Java 8 remains the most dominant version of Java

A majority of Java developers are using Java 8 or lower. This is based on a newly released report that revealed 79 percent of developers are using Java 8, 9 percent are using Java 7 and 3 percent are using Java 6 or below.

The JVM Ecosystem Survey Report was designed to look at the landscape of Java in terms of JDK implementations, tools, platforms and applications. The report was sponsored by Snyk and Oracle, is based off of more than 10,200 questionnaires, and was conducted through Java User Groups around the world.

The report took place between the release of Java 10 and Java 11. Due to structural changes to the JDK in Java 9, survey sponsors expected that would impact its migration and adoption. Only 4 percent of developers are using Java 9 and an additional 4 percent stated they were using Java 10.

Java 9 also brought a number of architectural changes as well as a new release cadence for Java SE versions. For instance, Java SE versions ship every six months while every two to three years a Long Term Support (LTS) release is offered. Java 9 was not a LTS release. When asked how developers are responding to Java’s new release cycle, only 8 percent stated they stay on top of the latest versions. Thirty percent decide on a release-by-release basis, 34 percent stay with the LTS release and another 28 percent “don’t know yet.”

“We expect that in the forthcoming year, best practices will emerge and companies will settle into a preferred migration cycle, which likely will vary considerably by industry,” the report stated.

When looking at JDK implementations used in production, the report found a majority of developers are using Oracle JDK for their main applications.

According to the report, 70 percent of respondents stated they use Oracle JDK in production while OpenJDK took 21 percent of the market share. Other JDK implementations included Eclipse OpenJ9/IBM J9, Android SDK, and Azul. “However, future licensing and support changes might cause these numbers to change in the future,” the report stated.

On the JDK side, the report also looked at versions of Java EE used for main applications, and the main JVM language used. About 40 percent of respondents claimed they do not use enterprise Java. Another 27 percent are using Java EE 7, and 22 percent are using Java EE 8. Java is the preferred JVM language with 9 in 10 developers claiming to use it. Other JVM languages used include Clojure, Kotlin, Groovy and Scala.

Java tools
The report also looked at the types of tools Java developers are using. According to the report, IntelliJ IDEA has surpassed Eclipse IDE with 45 percent of respondents using it. Thirty-eight percent of respondents are using Eclipse. Other IDEs used included Apache NetBeans, Vim, and Visual Studio Code.

For build tools, Maven is by far the most used in projects with 60 percent of respondents using it. This coincides with a 2016 report from RebelLabs, which found out of its 2,000 respondents, 68 percent were using Maven.

Other findings in this space included:

  • SonarQube, Findbugs and Checkstyle dominate the static quality tools space
  • Seventy-two percent of respondents use a static security tool in their testing
  • Jenkins is the number one CI server
  • Git is the top source code management platform
  • GitHub and Bitbucket are tied for developers main code repository, with GitLab closely following behind

Java platforms and applications
When looking into cloud technologies, the report found almost half of respondents are not using a cloud platform of some sort. For the 57 percent that are using cloud platforms, Amazon AWS is the top cloud provider, followed by Google Cloud, Azure, Red Hat OpenShift and Oracle Cloud.

In terms of the cloud approaches respondents use, 43 percent are using containers, VMs are still in the game at 33 percent, and serverless technology is still in its infancy with only 9 percent using this approach.

Other findings included:

  • Forty-three percent of respondents are not using continuous deployment or release automation tools, and 18 percent don’t know what they are using
  • Front end JavaScript and SQL are the type of non-JVM languages used in applications
  • Spring Boot and Spring MVC are the top web frameworks used by respondents
  • Sixty-four percent of respondents develop the same app server they use in production
  • 1 in 4 respondents don’t know how many open-source dependencies they have in their applications

The post Report: Java 8 remains the most dominant version of Java appeared first on SD Times.

via Click on the link for the full article

Report: Java 8 remains the most dominant version of Java

A majority of Java developers are using Java 8 or lower. This is based on a newly released report that revealed 79 percent of developers are using Java 8, 9 percent are using Java 7 and 3 percent are using Java 6 or below.

The JVM Ecosystem Survey Report was designed to look at the landscape of Java in terms of JDK implementations, tools, platforms and applications. The report was sponsored by Snyk and Oracle, is based off of more than 10,200 questionnaires, and was conducted through Java User Groups around the world.

The report took place between the release of Java 10 and Java 11. Due to structural changes to the JDK in Java 9, survey sponsors expected that would impact its migration and adoption. Only 4 percent of developers are using Java 9 and an additional 4 percent stated they were using Java 10.

Java 9 also brought a number of architectural changes as well as a new release cadence for Java SE versions. For instance, Java SE versions ship every six months while every two to three years a Long Term Support (LTS) release is offered. Java 9 was not a LTS release. When asked how developers are responding to Java’s new release cycle, only 8 percent stated they stay on top of the latest versions. Thirty percent decide on a release-by-release basis, 34 percent stay with the LTS release and another 28 percent “don’t know yet.”

“We expect that in the forthcoming year, best practices will emerge and companies will settle into a preferred migration cycle, which likely will vary considerably by industry,” the report stated.

When looking at JDK implementations used in production, the report found a majority of developers are using Oracle JDK for their main applications.

According to the report, 70 percent of respondents stated they use Oracle JDK in production while OpenJDK took 21 percent of the market share. Other JDK implementations included Eclipse OpenJ9/IBM J9, Android SDK, and Azul. “However, future licensing and support changes might cause these numbers to change in the future,” the report stated.

On the JDK side, the report also looked at versions of Java EE used for main applications, and the main JVM language used. About 40 percent of respondents claimed they do not use enterprise Java. Another 27 percent are using Java EE 7, and 22 percent are using Java EE 8. Java is the preferred JVM language with 9 in 10 developers claiming to use it. Other JVM languages used include Clojure, Kotlin, Groovy and Scala.

Java tools
The report also looked at the types of tools Java developers are using. According to the report, IntelliJ IDEA has surpassed Eclipse IDE with 45 percent of respondents using it. Thirty-eight percent of respondents are using Eclipse. Other IDEs used included Apache NetBeans, Vim, and Visual Studio Code.

For build tools, Maven is by far the most used in projects with 60 percent of respondents using it. This coincides with a 2016 report from RebelLabs, which found out of its 2,000 respondents, 68 percent were using Maven.

Other findings in this space included:

  • SonarQube, Findbugs and Checkstyle dominate the static quality tools space
  • Seventy-two percent of respondents use a static security tool in their testing
  • Jenkins is the number one CI server
  • Git is the top source code management platform
  • GitHub and Bitbucket are tied for developers main code repository, with GitLab closely following behind

Java platforms and applications
When looking into cloud technologies, the report found almost half of respondents are not using a cloud platform of some sort. For the 57 percent that are using cloud platforms, Amazon AWS is the top cloud provider, followed by Google Cloud, Azure, Red Hat OpenShift and Oracle Cloud.

In terms of the cloud approaches respondents use, 43 percent are using containers, VMs are still in the game at 33 percent, and serverless technology is still in its infancy with only 9 percent using this approach.

Other findings included:

  • Forty-three percent of respondents are not using continuous deployment or release automation tools, and 18 percent don’t know what they are using
  • Front end JavaScript and SQL are the type of non-JVM languages used in applications
  • Spring Boot and Spring MVC are the top web frameworks used by respondents
  • Sixty-four percent of respondents develop the same app server they use in production
  • 1 in 4 respondents don’t know how many open-source dependencies they have in their applications

The post Report: Java 8 remains the most dominant version of Java appeared first on SD Times.

via Click on the link for the full article

EdgeX Foundry launches new developer kits for IoT

EdgeX Foundry launched new EdgeX-enabled developer kits geared towards IoT edge computing at the IoT Solution World Congress in Barcelona this week. EdgeX Foundry is an open-source, vendor-neutral project designed to unify the IoT edge computing landscape. It is hosted by the Linux Foundation and designed to run on any hardware or operating system.

“Developer kits are important tools for building new applications and solutions. A variety of dev kits are already on the market; however, the majority of these kits lock the developer into a particular back-end platform or cloud. In comparison, dev kits based on the EdgeX framework will provide developers with the freedom to choose from an ecosystem of components bound together by the EdgeX interoperability APIs,” EdgeX Foundry wrote in a post.

The organization will be offering both community and commercial developer kits. The community dev kits can be purchased independently online and the code can be downloaded straight from GitHub. The first dev kit is based on the Samsung Artik with Grove sensor, but the company will continue to grow options, it explained.

The commercial track is intended to facilitate the emergence of an open marketplace for IoT edge computing. The kits will provide options for getting started with support from professionals so that users can focus on value-add, instead of supporting the code. The commercial kits are based on supported versions of the EdgeX framework, specific IoT platforms, and microservice plugins.

“With the emergence of these dev kits, developers will have the opportunity to prototype with their choice of ingredients while taking advantage of plug-in components from EdgeX’s growing vendor-neutral ecosystem,” said Jason Shepherd, EdgeX Foundry governing board chair and Dell Technologies IoT and edge computing CTO. “This allows them to focus on innovation rather than reinvention, in addition to being able to add and exchange components at any time to optimize their solution throughout the development and deployment lifecycle.”

In addition, the organization announced its upcoming code release codenamed “Delhi.” This third code release will feature major improvements such as management features, more security functionality, and new SDKs.

The organization also announced nine new members, which are: Rasking Automation GmbH, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT), DATA AHEAD, CertusNet, Redis Labs, the Federal University of Campina Grande (UFCG) /Embedded Lab, Intel, Windmill Enterprise and ZEDEDA.

“We’re standing at a critical point for digital transformation,” said Shepherd. “The massive volume of devices coming online represents a huge opportunity for innovation and is making edge computing a necessity. We need an open, cloud-native edge ecosystem enabled by EdgeX to minimize reinvention and facilitate building and deploying distributed, interoperable applications from the edge to the cloud. We’re thrilled to welcome these new member organizations into our already strong community that shares the same commitment to open collaboration and innovation.”

 

The post EdgeX Foundry launches new developer kits for IoT appeared first on SD Times.

via Click on the link for the full article

EdgeX Foundry launches new developer kits for IoT

EdgeX Foundry launched new EdgeX-enabled developer kits geared towards IoT edge computing at the IoT Solution World Congress in Barcelona this week. EdgeX Foundry is an open-source, vendor-neutral project designed to unify the IoT edge computing landscape. It is hosted by the Linux Foundation and designed to run on any hardware or operating system.

“Developer kits are important tools for building new applications and solutions. A variety of dev kits are already on the market; however, the majority of these kits lock the developer into a particular back-end platform or cloud. In comparison, dev kits based on the EdgeX framework will provide developers with the freedom to choose from an ecosystem of components bound together by the EdgeX interoperability APIs,” EdgeX Foundry wrote in a post.

The organization will be offering both community and commercial developer kits. The community dev kits can be purchased independently online and the code can be downloaded straight from GitHub. The first dev kit is based on the Samsung Artik with Grove sensor, but the company will continue to grow options, it explained.

The commercial track is intended to facilitate the emergence of an open marketplace for IoT edge computing. The kits will provide options for getting started with support from professionals so that users can focus on value-add, instead of supporting the code. The commercial kits are based on supported versions of the EdgeX framework, specific IoT platforms, and microservice plugins.

“With the emergence of these dev kits, developers will have the opportunity to prototype with their choice of ingredients while taking advantage of plug-in components from EdgeX’s growing vendor-neutral ecosystem,” said Jason Shepherd, EdgeX Foundry governing board chair and Dell Technologies IoT and edge computing CTO. “This allows them to focus on innovation rather than reinvention, in addition to being able to add and exchange components at any time to optimize their solution throughout the development and deployment lifecycle.”

In addition, the organization announced its upcoming code release codenamed “Delhi.” This third code release will feature major improvements such as management features, more security functionality, and new SDKs.

The organization also announced nine new members, which are: Rasking Automation GmbH, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT), DATA AHEAD, CertusNet, Redis Labs, the Federal University of Campina Grande (UFCG) /Embedded Lab, Intel, Windmill Enterprise and ZEDEDA.

“We’re standing at a critical point for digital transformation,” said Shepherd. “The massive volume of devices coming online represents a huge opportunity for innovation and is making edge computing a necessity. We need an open, cloud-native edge ecosystem enabled by EdgeX to minimize reinvention and facilitate building and deploying distributed, interoperable applications from the edge to the cloud. We’re thrilled to welcome these new member organizations into our already strong community that shares the same commitment to open collaboration and innovation.”

 

The post EdgeX Foundry launches new developer kits for IoT appeared first on SD Times.

via Click on the link for the full article

Progress introduces over 20 new .NET components in Telerik

Progress has released new Telerik tooling for .NET developers. The company is providing over 20 new Telerik components, expanding the most popular components, and adding new themes.

The new web components include features for several languages, such as ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET Core, JSP, PHP, jQuery, Vue, Angular, and React.

New mobile components include built in log-in, authentication, and app feedback screens; Expander, Accordion, Financial, and Donut Charts; and Border and Checkbox and scheduling features for the Calendar control.

New desktop components include a Mac-inspired Crystal theme, MultiColumnComboBox  control and selection support for the Image Editor, bookmarking functionality in PDFViewer, and agenda view in the Scheduler and NavigationView mode in the PageView for WinForms.

Progress has also launched a new version of Progress Kendo UI, which now supports Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 compliance.

“As developers, we understand how difficult and time-consuming it can be to create applications that not just work but also have stunning UI,” said Faris Sweis, SVP & general manager of the developer tooling business at Progress. “Having the best and most modern tools and UI components can be a great boost of productivity and enable our customers to build incredible applications that their end-users will fall in love with. We are pushing the limits on all fronts to serve our developers as always and as we have done since day one.”

 

The post Progress introduces over 20 new .NET components in Telerik appeared first on SD Times.

via Click on the link for the full article

SD Times news digest: Applitools’s new SDKs, Android background execution, and WhiteSource new funding

Applitools is expanding its visual testing platform to Cypress and Storybook, two popular software development tools. The new SDKs are designed to run visual tests instantly when developers write code. This will enable developers to discover visual bugs as soon as they are introduced, allowing them to deliver higher-quality apps faster.

“Finding and fixing bugs at the application development stage is significantly cheaper and easier than finding and fixing those bugs during QA, or worse, in production,” said Gil Sever, CEO of Applitools. “This dynamic is what’s driving the industry trend of ‘Shift Left’ and embedding testing earlier in the development lifecycle. Increasing release velocity, while maintaining software quality is a huge challenge for R&D teams. By expanding our AI powered visual testing platform to Cypress and Storybook, we provide frontend developers and test automation engineers the tools to do visual testing at the development stage, at the ultra-fast speeds needed to maintain agile and CI-CD development.”

The Android team details how it has evolved limits on background execution
The Android team has revealed more information on how to write modern applications, this time focusing on modern background execution. According to the team, an app is considered to be in the background if it does not meet the criteria for a foreground app, which are that is has visible activity, a foreground service, or another foreground app is connected to it.

Over the past several releases of Android, the team has placed limits on background execution in order to improve battery life and user experience. Some of these limits include Doze and App Standby, restricting app behavior when the screen is off; Background Location restrictions, limiting how frequently background apps can retrieve the user’s current location; Background Service Limits, restricting background services from being run and consuming CPU or network in a hidden way; App Standby Buckets that limit the device resources available to apps not used by users; and App Restrictions that prompt the user to restrict an app’s access to system resource if that app is exhibiting bad behavior.

WhiteSource raises $35 million in funding
WhiteSource has raised $35 million in funding, bringing its total funding up to $46 million. This funding will be used to expand the company’s reach with the addition of sales, marketing, and customer support operations in London and San Francisco, in addition to other locations for global expansion.

This funding round was led by Susquehanna Growth Equity, with participation from existing investors 83North and M12 – Microsoft Ventures.

“We are now at a stage where the question is not whether or not to use open source components, but how to put in place the solutions and policies to manage them well,” said Rami Sass, co-founder and CEO of WhiteSource. “Microsoft’s acquisition of GitHub for $7.5B showcases that companies have accepted open source as crucial to the software development process, but incidents such as the Equifax data breach underscore the necessity for all companies to protect their products from attacks that would exploit the open source components they are using.”

The post SD Times news digest: Applitools’s new SDKs, Android background execution, and WhiteSource new funding appeared first on SD Times.

via Click on the link for the full article

GitHub Universe 2018 zeros in on the future of software development

GitHub is giving developers new tools to advance development workflows and break down silos. The company announced GitHub Actions and GitHub Connect at its annual developer conference GitHub Universe 2018 in San Francisco this week.

“Together, you are not only defining the future of software but the future of the businesses, industries, and communities that depend on it. The best work we can do supports you in this endeavor with a relentless focus on the developer experience,” Jason Warner, head of technology at GitHub, wrote in a post.

GitHub Actions, available now in a limited public beta, is a community-powered platform. It enables developers to connect and share containers for their workflow; and build, package, release, update and deploy projects in any language without having to run code. GitHub Actions was developed to empower developers to choose their developer tools, language and deployment platforms that make them the most productive and creative without having to get locked into tools or workflows.

“By applying open source principles to workflow automation, GitHub Actions empowers you to pair the tools and integrations you use with your own custom actions or those shared by the GitHub community, no matter what languages or platforms you use. Develop and share actions to automate any task your projects require, building on an ecosystem of options. Whether you need to package an NPM module, send an SMS alert, or deploy production-ready code to the cloud in parallel, you can create or find a GitHub Action for the job,” Warner wrote.

GitHub Connect aims to bridge the gap between business and open-source communities. It features Unified Business Identity, Unified Search and Unified Contributions. According to the company, this will enable developers to connect to GitHub’s public data and communities whether their business runs GitHub Enterprise or Business Cloud.

Unified Business Identity, in limited public beta, enables admins to unify the management of multiple Business Cloud accounts in order to manage billing, licensing, permissions and policies in a single interface. Unified Search enables developers to search public and private repositories on GitHub without having to leave GitHub Enterprise. With Contributions, developers can also get recognition for their work on their public profiles.

The company also released Java and .NET support for security vulnerability alerts, a GitHub Security Advisory API, and new GitHub learning labs.

“This is pretty exciting news, as it highlights automation and digital transformation, being one of the most important topics for business these days.  It’s even affecting how development is being done. There has always been some aspects to automation during the development lifecycle. What GitHub is doing, is standardizing this across an entire platform that is being used by millions,” said Vadim Tabakman, manager of technical evangelism at Nintex. “Every part of the business needs to look at digital transformation and how best they need to adopt it.  Development, which some see as at the forefront of technology, can also be impacted by being left behind if they don’t innovate around their processes.”

In addition, GitHub released its 2018 State of the Octoverse, its annual statistics about its community. The report revealed more than 31 million developers are building on GitHub, more than 2.1 million organizations are using GitHub across public and private repositories, more than 96 million repositories are hosted on GitHub, and since launching security alerts last year the company has seen more than five million vulnerabilities alerts across open-source projects.

The post GitHub Universe 2018 zeros in on the future of software development appeared first on SD Times.

via Click on the link for the full article

DBmaestro DevOps Platform 7.5 focuses on flexibility, better tracking and project hierarchy

DevOps database solution provider DBmaestro has announced the latest release of its CI/CD and release automation solution. DBmaestro DevOps Platform 7.5 rolls out with a focus on flexibility and compliance.

In addition, the release provides PostgreSQL support. According to the company, PostgreSQL is quickly becoming the leading database for DevOps teams. DB-Engines ranks it fourth amoung hundreds of databases around the world. “Our DevOps platform unleashes the power of PostgreSQL databases by enabling DevOps and database teams to implement DevOps best practices and accelerate time to market with a high level of confidence, minimal risk and maximum efficiency,” said Yaniv Yehuda, CTO at DBmaestro.

For flexibility, DBmaestro now enables users to build from any environment to any environment as well as for different pipelines and projects. “In addition, customers can build a hot fix (just the delta) from one environment to another,” Yehuda wrote in a blog post. “DBmaestro will find all these inconsistencies between the environments and allow to override it, roll it back, or merge it back to development.”

The release also aims to provide better tracking with tags. Tags enable users to track tickets, their environment, and impact of objects and tickets. Yehuda explained tags also enable improved support and information of what was deployed and why, and offers more details, which can become useful for complying with specific regulations.

For multi-project implementations, the company now provides the ability to add relations between several pipelines. For instance, users can specify a development pipeline or a production pipeline.

“When it comes to package promotion and transfer between projects, you can move the package, or create a build. DBmaestro can use a promotion or transfer/command in order to move the packages between these projects. At the same time, you can take the drift from production and create a script in the release source. Versions can move from one environment to the other through the development-oriented pipeline, and then graduate to the production-oriented pipeline,” Yehuda wrote.

 

The post DBmaestro DevOps Platform 7.5 focuses on flexibility, better tracking and project hierarchy appeared first on SD Times.

via Click on the link for the full article

Syncfusion’s Essential Studio 2018 Volume 3 improves data visualization

Syncfusion has announced the third major release of Essential Studio 2018 this year.

Newly added features include TreeView to organize information more efficiently, TextInputLayout controls for Xamarin, a PivotGrid data visualization control for JS2, and a new JS2 progress button.

According to the company, the addition of the PivotGrid data visualization demonstrates the company’s drive to improve.

“We do not believe it is enough simply to offer controls and features that reflect industry trends, we must also listen to the developers who are guiding those trends,” said Daniel Jebaraj, vice president of Syncfusion. “Current users will find that Volume 3 reflects their specific needs, and new users will benefit from improvements that have been guided by their peers.”

Other new features include new doughnut chart and histograms, the ability for Xamarin applications to process digital signed PDF documents, UI updates to Essential JS2, a new Pareto chart type and bubble tile visualization for the Heatmap control, the ability to easily added Excel-like pivoting to web applications, and high-DPI support for most controls.

The post Syncfusion’s Essential Studio 2018 Volume 3 improves data visualization appeared first on SD Times.

via Click on the link for the full article